2012 Honey Show

2012 Honey Show

New Bigger and Better Honey Show this Year

Information will be included in your Program book and also posted in the Registration Area when you arrive, along with the exact location of the drop-off area and of the Show itself.

ATTENTION! ALL HONEY SHOW PARTICIPANTS
If you use a Gamber Classic jar when entering the liquid honey categories and win 1st place you’ll receive a $100 Gamber Container gift certificate, if you win 2nd place you’ll receive a $50 Gamber Container gift certificate. This is a change from past years when Gamber offered a Savings Bond in each of these categories.

Drop Off Show Entries:
Tuesday Afternoon 3-5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Morning 10 – noon and Afternoon1-3 p.m.

 

 Pick Up Entries
Friday After Lunch
(Hours Will Be Posted
At Conference)

Show Rules, click hereYou can print them out.

 

  • Extracted Honey, Creamed Honey
  • Beeswax, pieces, candles, novelties
  • Mead & Honey Beer
  • Arts and Crafts
  • Photography
  • Gadget Show
  • Honey Cookery
  • Comb Honey, Cut Comb, Chunk, Frame of Honey

 

 

 

We have a new Resources web page loaded with helpful articles to improve your show entries.


Did Someone Say Honey Show?

By Mike Palmer

When I was a new beekeeper, the Eastern Apicultural Society came to Burlington, Vermont. The convention bowled me over and filled my brain with so many possibilities thus far never dreamed of, that my head swam. I could go on and on with the stories and the many friends I made at that 1980 meeting.

trophieOne of the events at EAS 1980 that impressed me the most was the honey show. The honey and the beeswax and the photographs and the pies, and the silver: Wow, the silver! Those beautiful silver plates and the silver bowl for “Best in Show” really made an impression on this youngster. The beekeepers who won the top awards must really know their stuff. To receive an EAS silver award, considering the strict judging and fierce competition, was a huge honor. I decided then and there I would try my best to win my own EAS silver. I didn’t do too badly either over the years, with a display shelf of plates and a “Best in Show” bowl.

Are the EAS Competitive Shows just about winning silver? I don’t think so. Isn’t it about showing off what your bees have given you, presenting the beauty of their gifts to the others, and carrying that beauty forward in the products you provide for sale? The competitive shows at the Eastern Apicultural annual convention combine all that. It’s hands-on beekeeper education at its best.

Over the last number of years, the EAS Competitive Show has taken a back shelf in a back room. No longer are there tables filled with carefully prepared entries, covered in colored ribbons from pink to blue.  Gone are the silver awards that so inspired me. Gone are the participants. Why? The EAS Show used to be the highlight of the summer for me, and I know from the number of entries and the keen competition at the time, for many of the other conference goers as well.

What do you think? Are you up for the challenge? Is your honey as good as you think it is? Can you present it in a way that shows off its natural beauty, just as it comes from the bees? And tell me. Are we all really too busy to get something ready for the show? I don’t believe it, and others I’m in contact with don’t either. In Burlington Vermont, we’ll be bringing back the EAS Competitive Shows, the quality judging, the ribbons, and of course, the silver awards.  We have a rare opportunity to teach our beekeepers, both experienced and novices, how to prepare and present what is given them by their fuzzy little charges:  a rare opportunity to show, as an association what it’s all about.

Organize a workshop with your home beekeeping club, and teach your members how to prepare for both shelf and show. Take what you’ve learned to Burlington Vermont, in August of 2012. Who knows what treasure you might take home.

Need help? Click here for articles on preparing for the show.